Rapid Response Work

 

Alongside our planned programme of work we also provide the Department of Health and Social Care and the National Institute of Health Research with rapid research responses.

Some of our responses can be seen below.

 

Topics

Strength and balance exercises for falls prevention and musculoskeletal health

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Aims

This rapid review aims to give an overview of current literature on exercises for falls prevention and musculoskeletal health, looking at:

  • General health benefits of exercise across the lifespan.
  • How strength and balance functional exercises prevent falls in community dwelling older people
  • Generalised benefits of exercise, especially strength and balance on musculoskeletal health.
  • Psychological benefits including reducing fear of falling and are cost effective in fall prevention.

Policy relevance

To provide policy makers with an overview of a large amount of literature and their summaries

What matters to people with multiple condition (multimorbidities) and their carers?

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This paper focuses on issues that are specific or unique to the lived experience of older people living with multiple conditions, drawing on work conducted in 2017 to support the James Lind Alliance (JLA) Priority Setting Partnership (PSP) exercise on Multiple Conditions in Later Life.

Aims

  • To highlight the concerns of care recipients and the public.
  • Identify, highlight and synthesise the issues that are important to older people living with multiple conditions and their carers.

 

How effective is public health advice for healthy ageing and can it be updated based on any recent research?

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This paper is a response to a specific request from NHS England for research into the identification of frailty in younger populations.

Identification and management of frailty is central to supporting people to age well. This includes those with severe frailty, as well as early identification of mild to moderate frailty, to enable a more targeted and preventative approach to care. 

Aims

  • To synthesise existing evidence on how frailty is identified and measured in younger populations (<60 years)
  • To investigate if there are there validated tools to identify frailty in younger groups
  • To investigate how the existing tools used to identify frailty in younger groups

Policy relevance

Identification and management of frailty is central to supporting people to age well and part of the vision of the NHS Long-Term Plan. Current policy and guidance on the assessment of frailty focuses on older populations, but identification of frailty in younger groups may also have clinical value. This work was requested by NHS England.

Identifying clinical frailty in younger groups

More information

This proposal represents a response to a specific request from NHS England for research into the identification of frailty in younger populations.

Identification and management of frailty is central to supporting people to age well. This includes those with severe frailty, as well as early identification of mild to moderate frailty, to enable a more targeted and preventative approach to care. 

Aims

  • To synthesise existing evidence on how frailty is identified and measured in younger populations (<60 years)

  • To investigate if there are there validated tools to identify frailty in younger groups?
  • To investigate how the existing tools used to identify frailty in younger groups?

Policy relevance

Identification and management of frailty is central to supporting people to age well and part of the vision of the NHS Long-Term Plan. Current policy and guidance on the assessment of frailty focuses on older populations, but identification of frailty in younger groups may also have clinical value. This work was requested by NHS England.

 

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